George Soros uses capitalism to reform it

Over the history of financial markets, very few investors have ever been able to earn more than 20 percent returns per year. In fact, there are very few investors alive today who have reached that lofty goal. One of them is George Soros. After running his own hedge fund for more than 45 years, Soros has returned almost 25 percent per year, making him one of the greatest investors in history and the greatest hedge fund manager alive today.

But Soros never intended to become a master of capitalism. From his earliest years, he was instead interested in pursuing a life of the mind. Growing up amid a toxic, anti-Semitic environment, his family was forced to leave his native Hungary in the early 1940s, after the Nazis took over his homeland. While his father was sagacious enough to quickly move the family away from the threats that the Nazi invasion presented, many of Soros’ relatives were not so fortunate. He lost dozens of extended family members to the Nazi death camps. Learn more about his profile at businessinsider.com.

This proved to be a formative experience in Soros’s life, leading him to develop an intense interest in understanding the ways in which societies are constructed and the ways in which political movements can directly affect all in their presence. Soros quickly learned the validity of the phrase that even though you may not care about politics, politics cares about you.

After graduating from high school with all As, George Soros applied to and was accepted at the London School of Economics. There he studied under famed philosophy professor Karl Popper, whose best-known work was the famous book ‘The Open Society and Its Enemies’. This book had a lasting impact on Soros’ philosophy and the way in which he chose to live his life. Eventually, Soros named his flagship philanthropic organization, The Open Society Foundations, after the book’s title. He was also deeply influenced by Popper’s view that the goal of any social order should be to maximize the freedom of all participants.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2016/07/george-soros-democratic-convention-226267

After graduation, Soros floundered for a number of years. Working a number of menial jobs, he eventually threw in the towel five years after graduation and decided to apply at Wall Street firms. At the behest of a friend, he applied to the firm called Singer and Friedlander, where he was shocked at how quickly he was hired. This marked the beginning of Soros Wall Street career. It is noteworthy that if Soros would have found suitable work in his field of philosophy, it is unlikely that he ever would have ended up as a Wall Street trader. This makes him unique among most billionaires, who almost always know from a young age that they wish to pursue a career in business. Read this article at Washington Times.

Today, Soros is one of the world’s foremost philanthropists and, perhaps, the greatest investor who ever lived.

Stephen Murray’s Success As A Private Equity Investor

Stephen “Steve” P. Murray is a renowned American private equity investor. He spent most of his career life at CCMP Capital, where he was both the president and the chief executive officer until recently when he resigned from the positions due to health reasons.

Apart from being a key executive officer in the United States’ financial sector, he was also involved in many philanthropic activities. He used these activities to improve the livelihood of the less fortunate in the society.

Steve was born on August 2, 1962. According to Institutional Investor magazine, the future private equity investor was brought up in Westchester County, NY. Later, he moved to Boston for his college education. Stephen Murray graduated with a degree in economics from the Boston College in 1984.

He also holds a Master’s degree in Business Administration from the Columbia Business School.  On receiving his undergraduate degree, Steve returned to New York City to look for job.

His good academic background quickly earned him a position at the Manufacturers Hanover Trust as a credit trainee. With the desire to enhance his career, he quickly moved up the management ladder. Steve put a lot of effort on his job.

After earning his master’s degree in 1989, the firm promoted the young Stephen Murray CCMP Capital to the vice president’s position of the company’s middle-market lending unit. He was then transferred to the private equity and leveraged finance unit of the company. This move shaped the rest of his career.  Learn more about Stephen Murray CCMP Capital: https://www.pehub.com/2007/10/5-questions-with-stephen-murray/

In 1990’s, JP Morgan went through three mergers that saw the company change its name to JP Morgan Partners in 2000. The new merger saw Murray named as the head of buyout business in the bank in 2005.

Murray led a spin off of CCMP from JP Morgan Partners. As part of the JP Morgan, the business unit headed by Murray received numerous challenges. One of these challenges included not being able to receive business deals from the company as it would be considered favoring of in-house firm.

According to Murray, the spin off changed CCMP’s business for the better. Today, the firm ranks as one of the largest private equity firms in the globe.

As a philanthropist, Murray has supported Boston College, Stamford Museum, Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Food Bank of Lower Fairfield County. Murray was married to Tami A. Murray and the couple had four sons.